What will change on June 15

California is preparing to get back to normal. On June 15, capacity and distancing restrictions will be lifted for most businesses and activities. Large-scale indoor events will have vaccination or negative test requirements for attendees through at least October 1.

Find out more

California’s blueprint for reopening has criteria for loosening and tightening restrictions on activities based on the level of spread of COVID-19.

On this page:

Current tier assignments as of June 8, 2021

Every county in California is assigned to a tier based on its positivity rate, adjusted case rate, and health equity metric. Counties must remain in a tier for at least 3 weeks before moving to a less restrictive tier. Counties must meet the next tier’s criteria for two consecutive weeks to move to a less restrictive tier. If a county’s metrics worsen for two consecutive weeks, it will be assigned a more restrictive tier. Read more about tier assignment rules.

California has reached 4 million vaccination doses in the Vaccine Equity Benchmark. New Blueprint tier assignments were announced on April 6, 2021, with an effective date of April 7, 2021.

California’s county risk levels

All data and tier assignments are based on results from week ending May 29, 2021. See how tiers are assigned and changed, as well as county historical data (California Blueprint Data Chart), at CDPH’s Blueprint for a Safer Economy framework. Learn about regional ICU capacity at CDPH’s ICU Data.

Beyond the Blueprint

On June 15, California is expected to fully reopen and capacity and distancing restrictions will be lifted for most businesses and activities. The county tier system based on the Blueprint for a Safer Economy will no longer be in effect. 

Find complete details in the CDPH Beyond the Blueprint for Industry and Business Sectors.
Review answers to your questions about getting back to normal on the CDPH Questions and Answers page.

Reopening safely for all communities

COVID-19 has impacted some communities more than others. Adults 65 and older, people with pre-existing health conditions, Latinos, Blacks, Pacific Islanders, people who are low-income, and our essential worker community all face higher rates of infection and death.

Key indicators that determine reopening

Adjusted case rate
Daily new cases (per 100k)
7-day average of daily COVID-19 cases per 100K with 7-day lag, adjusted for number of tests performed
Positivity rate7-day average of all COVID-19 tests performed that are positive
Health equity metric (Positivity rate for HPI quartile 1)7-day average of all COVID-19 tests performed that are positive for the lowest quartile, quartile 1, according to the Healthy Places Index
Vaccines administeredNumber of vaccines doses administered statewide to people in the Health Places Index lowest quartile, quartile 1 (Vaccine Equity Metric)

Health equity metric

Counties must address COVID-19 in all communities to open further, including making sure the positivity rate in certain neighborhoods (health equity metric) does not significantly lag behind overall county positivity rates. These efforts need cross-sector and broad partnerships to succeed. The health equity metric is only used to decide whether a county can move to a less restrictive tier. Learn more about this focus on equity.

Vaccine equity metric

Forty percent (40%) of COVID-19 cases and deaths occur in California’s lowest Healthy Places Index (HPI) quartile. The Healthy Places Index, developed by the Public Health Alliance of Southern California, helps us visualize community conditions such as low income, education completeness, and health care access. To end the pandemic, we prioritized vaccine distribution to people in HPI quartile 1. This approach helped lower the rate of community infection, hospitalization, and death. It also helped reduce the emergence of new variants. You can track the progress of vaccines administered to HPI quartiles on our vaccine dashboard.

When we met the Vaccine Equity Benchmarks of administering 2 million and 4 million to the hardest-hit communities statewide we expanded the Blueprint for a Safer Economy tiers to allow for somewhat higher case rates in the Substantial (red), Moderate (orange), and Minimal (yellow) tiers. Learn more about these changes in CDPH’s Blueprint for a Safer Economy framework.

How to move between risk levels

There are two measures to determine how counties move through tiers: case rates and test positivity. We’ve been tracking these measures through regular progression and accelerated progression. To move to a higher tier with regular progression, a county must meet the case rate and test positivity thresholds for that tier for two consecutive weeks. Accelerated progression requires that test positivity and health equity metric are especially low with a declining case rate to move to a less restrictive tier. Read comprehensive detail about how counties can move through tiers.

 

The positivity rate in the matrix above excludes people in state and federal prisons, US Immigration and Customs Enforcement facilities, US Marshal detention facilities, and Department of State Hospitals facilities.
*Small counties (those with a population less than 106,000) may be subject to alternate case assessment measures for purposes of tier assignment.
**Health equity metric is not applied for small counties. The health equity metric is used to move to a less restrictive tier.

 

Questions and answers

The case rate, test positivity, and health equity metric thresholds must be met to move forward toward more reopening.

Widespread

More than 10.0 daily new cases (per 100k)*

More than 8.0% positive test for entire county**

Substantial

6.0 –10.0 daily new cases (per 100k)*

5.0 – 8.0% positive tests for entire county**

Less than 8.1% positive tests for health equity quartile**

Moderate

2.0 –5.9 daily new cases (per 100k)*

2.0 – 4.9% positive tests for entire county**

Less than 5.3% positive tests for health equity quartile**

Minimal

Less than 2.0 daily new cases (per 100k*)

Less than 2.0% positive tests for entire county**

Less than 2.2% positive tests for health equity quartile**


If both the test positivity and health equity metric are especially low, and the case rate is declining but does not yet meet less restrictive tier’s level, a county can still move forward towards more reopening. See rules on accelerated progression.

Widespread

Many non-essential indoor business operations are closed

Substantial

Some non-essential indoor business operations are closed

Moderate

Some indoor business operations are open with modifications

Minimal

Most indoor business operations are open with modifications